12.18.2021

An Editorial portrait done for an article in Restaurant Business Magazine about the "dilemma" of restaurant owners grappling with "no smoking" laws in their communities.

 


This is Vick. He owned a restaurant in Southwest Travis County. He loved his smoking customers. 

My assignment was to photograph him for the story. I wanted to show his defiance. Back then I was using Mamiya 6 cameras. A big, chunky 6 by 6 centimeter film frame. Killer lenses. Rangefinder focusing and twelve frames on a roll. I liked the shot but I didn't know how it would turn out while I was taking it because one of the risky things about shooting with slow transparency films and cameras that didn't allow for Polaroid test shots was the fear that you might get your film back from the lab only to discover that you weren't nearly as dialed in as you thought you were. No raw files to save you back then...

I dodged a bullet on this one. The exposure settled in exactly where my handheld meter said it should. 

The magazine was happy, but a while later Vicks was gone. A victim perhaps of unavoidable social change?

Fujichrome 100 film. 75mm f4.0 lens. Exhale slowly while shooting at slow shutter speeds....

Often I'll take a photograph in the streets just because it seems funny to me. Those turn out to be favorites. But usually only my favorites...

 


that photo is so....corny...

Hanging out on the Spanish Steps, after school. No sneaky camera moves here. Just a big smile and being ready to make a photograph.


 On a different trip to Rome I took only a couple of Mamiya 6, medium format rangefinder cameras, three lenses and a bag stuffed full of black and white film. I spent ten days wandering around every street and back alley. In all the time I spent there with big cameras in my hands I was never confronted by anyone aggressive or scary. Some people waved me off. Some people waved me in and some people smiled, nodded and ignored me. 

Shooting with bigger cameras sometimes means it's hard to hide. Maybe the goal should be to fit in with the flow...

Printed on double weight paper in my studio darkroom. Agfa Brovira? Either that or Seagull. Ah, those were beautiful papers. Just the right destination for the potential poured into black and white film. 

ISO 400 with slow lenses. It's a wonder we got anything.... (biting sarcasm).