9.04.2017

Lighting Mr. Hooper.


It's always all about the big, spot main light. For this portrait of a very accomplished theatrical talent I used a large softbox over to the right side of the frame. I realized though that getting the light in as close as I wanted it (approximately the same distance to subject as the diagonal measure of the light itself...) I would risk burning out his left shoulder. I used a Westcott FastFrame with a two stop net between the bottom, rear quarter of the softbox and his shoulder, feathering it so it would not cause an obvious drop in overall exposure. This allowed me to get the soft transition across his face and not worry about over lighting my subject on the main light side. I used a 50 inch, round, pop-up diffuser on the shadow side as passive fill and one light, dialed way down, on the background to bring it up just a hair.

The frame is cropped down from a 3:2 aspect ratio. I used a Sony A7Rii and an FE 85mm f1.8 to make the image. The camera was set to uncompressed Raw.

The main light is the Neewer Vision 4 battery powered monolight and the background light is the Godox AD200 using the standard reflector with its front diffuser.

If you don't like the expression on this image (I do...) then I have 519 others to choose from. Across four wardrobe changes.

3 comments:

  1. Great portrait! As always a masterful control of the light and rapport with the subject. Would love to see your take on more dramatic portrayal of this actor.

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  2. Looks good Kirk, lovely skin tones on the sitter and a confident expression.

    I like the nice light grey background as well.

    All the best!

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  3. The effect is to make the sitter seem transparent, open, and attractive, which I reckon he must be. But one question: why not a bit more chiaroscuro, a bit more dramatic, like a lot of your older B&W portraits?

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