3.26.2010

A quick report on the Olympus EPL

There is something absolutely exhilarating about shooting wonderful images with a camera that cost 1/10th the amount I paid for a Nikon D2x in 2005. 


If you look back over this blog for the past three months you find that I love shooting with the Olympus EP2 very much.  It's a very fluid camera to shoot with.  The EVF is great.  The image quality is great.  Even the industrial design makes me happy.

So there really wasn't any reason to go out and buy an EPL, was there?  Well, not so fast.  Even though these cameras aren't specifically aimed at working professionals I use them on just about every assignment that comes along which doesn't have, as a parameter somewhere, the need to impress and art director or a client.  In fact, on my recent trip to west Texas, in search of ART, I used my EP2 almost exclusively.  And when I use cameras in that fashion I really like to have a back up camera.  If something goes wrong a thousand miles from home I want to make sure the project doesn't have to end prematurely.  Reminds me of a job on a hot, dusty day in August in the desert outside Palm Springs when two Hasselblads in a row jammed up on me in the space of an hour.  Didn't I look like a boy scout when I was able to pull a third one out of the bag?!?  I really like the idea of redundancy when it comes to critical gear.

So, when Precision Camera got a new supply in I went by to play with one.  The camera is obviously the result of two previous learning curve.  Buttons are bigger and clearer.  The shutter button has a better feel.  The mode dial, while not as spiffy of a design, sits right on top of the camera and is clear and easy to read.  The flash is utilitarian and surprisingly well designed.  If I hold the erected flash back with one finger I can bounce it straight off the ceiling.  The camera looks.......utilitarian.  It just doesn't draw the eye the way the Japanese Sixties Minimalist design ethos of the EP2 does.  It's a black brick that works.  And that endears me to it.  It feels like a working tool

Three warnings so no one will come back and bitch:  1.  The mounting flange on the back of the lens is made of a composite (nice word for tough plastic).  I don't think it makes any difference in quality on the file but it's.......plastic.  There.  I said it.  2.  The rear screen is a bit smaller than the one on the EP2.  I use the big screen only for menu items so it doesn't bother me.  I use the EVF for everything else.  The one plus this might have is that it takes less battery power to light up a smaller screen.  3.  There is not a separate wheel to adjust shutter speeds or apertures independantly.  You have to use the "left/right, up/down" keys on the back to change the settings.  Sounds gruesome but in reality I mostly use the "A" mode so all I want to change is the aperture or the "+/-" compensation.  And the lack of a back mounted wheel means fewer accidental changes.

While I haven't had time to test it out myself, early adopters have mentioned that the anti-aliasing filter over the sensor is less aggressive which means that the images right out of the camera should have much better fine detail or should look sharper with less post production.  Sharper images are always welcome.


Some other features that we can't dismiss too quickly:  The flash can be set to full, 1/4, 1/16 and 1/64th power so you could actually use the in body flash as an optical trigger for your studio flashes.  It can be also be used to control Olympus "R" flashes wirelessly.  This means you don't have to choose between using your EVF and triggering your lights!!!!  Course they could have made it really simple and put a sync socket somewhere on the camera body.  They will probably save that for inclusion onto the new professional mFT body they'll announce in the Fall.  Oooops!  Did I just say that out loud?

The cost.  This cameras, which also doubles as a great HD video camera, cost me the princely sum of $599.  With a very good zoom lens.  That it outperforms my $5000 from only three and a half years ago is astounding.  If you are practiced and careful with your technique you should be able to get absolutely professional results with this piece of gear.  At that price, if you are confronted with a shoot that presents a hazardous environment for gear but comes with a good budget, you could easily consider this little system expendable.

I have a fantasy of dumping everything else and doing business with a couple Pen cameras, some adapters and some other lenses.  The business is changing so quickly.  Content is moving inexorably to the web and to electronic tablets.  I feel like putting to the test the old saw,  "It's not the tool, it's the photographer behind it."


By way of full disclosure:  I went into the local store and bought this camera with my own money. No one offered me any money or equipment to coerce me to like this camera or to say nice things about it.  All the stuff written on this blog is here because I like photography and I like to write about it.  It would be nice if you clicked on some of the product links but you sure don't have to.  I'll disclose that as well.  All those annoying links have returned something like $100 this year.  Not getting rich writing fun content.  But it's nice to know that you stopped by and took a look.

All the best, Kirk

56 comments:

Matt W said...

Cool. I just bought an E-PL1 to replace my E-520 (I was going to upgrade to an E-3, but decided to get an E-PL1 and 20mm Panny combo), and I just absolutely love it.

I'm not a professional photographer by any means, just a college student interested in photography who wants to take high quality pictures at family/friend events.

Anyway, I'm looking forward to reading anything else you have to say on it and I hope you enjoy using it.

kirk tuck said...

Hey Matt, I really like the whole m4/3rds concept. So far I've enjoyed shooting both the cameras. I think you made the right choice.

matt shumate said...

I've had my misgivings with Oly over the last 6 months or so, & even though I went and switched brands for my wedding work, I guarantee I'll be picking one of these up to use as a P&S as well as for video & macro. Thanks for another great article Kirk.

amalric said...

My concern is smaller DR, compared to the 620. Why did they drop it down? Is it related o a harsher contrast curve or to the AA filter?

Am.

kirk tuck said...

Who says it's got a smaller DR? Did they measure it? It could be that they've just set a harder curve to make it seem snappier to the bulk of its intended market. A few moments changing the contrast settings in the modes you like to use might work like a charm.

Tony P said...

I heard that focus is faster also. I already own E-P1 but I still want an e-pl1 with a viewfinder. Guess I have to control myself.

jevtovic said...

Very nice text Kirk. You pointed well to pros of E-PL1 compared to E-P1/2.

Anonymous said...

Why did you not use more beautiful feet? Then comes the mess down!

Lenzflair said...

I read the specs on the EPL-1 and wasn't drawn to it. Nice to know someone capable that owns it. I bought a 520 to carry around all the time, but it's still too big. This might be the ticket.

Anonymous said...

Dagnabbit! I love my Olympus gear--e620 with the 50-200mm zoom, the EP-2 with an adapter for a Leica 50mm Summarit, and now you come up with another rationale I can use for buying another camera. Wish they had built the flash trigger into the EP-2. I have to fight lens lust and camera greed on a daily basis for the sake of my bank account. This does not help in the fight, but thanks for the post.

Love your blog and your books and your thinking. Now if I can just win the lottery...
M

Alan said...

A garage with art in it, that's great!

I've had my m43 body on my 43 lenses and I like how the little body just sat there while I hold the lens. When m43 AF gets up to snuff I can see it being a excellent pro shooting tool in the right situations.

Andy R Kett said...

been looking at this camera more and more as a serious replacement/complement for my DSLR instead buying the E-620 or E-30 i think this is the way forward and a lot more versatile

Have added you the list of blogs i follow now kirk
ARK

mike said...

Thanks for sharing.
I just found this article on E-System Community group.

I have to the decide between the two, EP-2 or EPL-1 since the EV-2 can't be used on EP-1. The joy of legacy lenses, you know what I mean :)

I haven't tried the EPL-1 yet, but is the control more difficult than the EP-2? Especially when you use manual old lenses in M?

Thanks. And I do enjoy reading your blog so much.

regards,
mike

Raianerastha said...

Thanks again Kirk. You are making my life easier! I have found myself doing more "walk around discovery" shooting. Things like going for a walk during lunch or after work. While I love my E520 kit, I find myself carrying my old Kodak z712is around more because of the compact size and was looking toward saving up for the E-P2. However from what you've said the E-PL will serve me just as well with budget left over for the adapter to use my 4/3 size lenses on it.

I agree that the m4/3 concept is very forward thinking in relation to how imaging is changing. While there will always be those who insist that a 21MP sensor "Full Frame" dslr is a "true pro spec" camera, I think the pendulum is swinging back toward the atmospher when Kodachrome helped 35mm take over the bulk of pro uses from MF and press/view cameras.

People may bemoan the potential loss of OVF, but then a a couple of decades ago they were bemoaning the switch to auto exposure and auto focus. And a couple decades before that it was the loss of leaf shutters and big 2 1/4" negs.

Thanks for keeping us informed.

Stever said...

Great piece Kirk.Oh yeah, thanks a pant-load for giving me something else to wanna buy now...

jasonhindle said...

Thanks for your views on this. I find it interesting to contrast Olympus's market segmentation (it's a beginners camera) and the views of professionals and advances amateurs. I think Olympus are missing a trick here.

kirk tuck said...

I think camera manufacturers are always behind the curve as to what is cool and what isn't. I'll also go out on a limb and say that, when camera models hit a sales level that makes them ultimately the mainstream choice (such as the Canon 5dMk2) the trend is already played out and the early adopters are already on to the next thing.

Anonymous said...

I think photographers fall into two camps, those who depend on equipment to make photographs and those who depend on their vision to make photographs. The reason you can get away with using small, cheap cameras is the clarity of your vision. It also helps that you've practiced away your need for gear crutches.

Kurt Shoens said...

I've read the statement about camera manufacturers being behind the curve several times now and just don't get it.

Maybe you're saying that the market underdogs (e.g., Olympus, Pentax) have to try harder, are more willing to take risks, and therefore make more interesting products.

Since you're putting to the test the old saw, "It's not the tool, it's the photographer behind it," the cool factor doesn't matter. Right?

Actually I'll disagree with the old saw. I think if you like the cameras you use, you're probably going to do better work. In any case, happier work. The attraction of the camera might be size, specific features, or the fact that it's a minority taste.

Not that we're self-conscious about how we look taking pictures ...

Nikolaj said...

dpreview wrote about the EPL-1:

Its simplified interface dictates that it'll be best suited to compact camera users who want to get better photos straight away and learn about things such as apertures in their own time. Experienced users who regularly want to take control of individual shooting parameters are likely to find themselves frustrated by the sheer amount of button-pressing induced by the loss of control dials.

What is your opinion about this?

kirk tuck said...

Hey Kurt,

What I really meant was that the manufacturers believe they have identified a market: The EPL is supposed to be the "down market" mass consumer appeal version of the more expensive EP2. They don't get that the EPL's core market are advanced photographers who will use this camera just like the EP2, mostly ignoring the more consumer oriented gizmos that come built in.

Just as Honda aimed their Element at surfers and college students only to find that their core market turned out to be practical people over 50....... And more women than men. Aimed at the surfer boys and hit the older woman with kids at college......

kirk tuck said...

Nikolaj,

I disagree. I think the interface is pretty close to the EP2 and take only a little time to learn. I shoot a lot in "A" aperture mode and I only need to change the way I change aperture to make the whole camera work for me. So many of the commands are the same.

So you push on button to change up and one to change down rather than twirl the knob.

Anonymous said...

How do you deal with the EPL's lack of a square aspect ratio?
Its listed specs do not include square aspect as a option.

John Krumm said...

Well Kirk, looking at the number of posts you get every time you talk about equipment, perhaps a new book called "The Small Camera Revolution" would do well, with a substantial chunk, if not all, focused on micro-fourthirds.

TC said...

How is the AF compared to the EP2? Also, do you ever have a problem with the relatively low upper shutter speed while shooting at large apertures on bright days?

kirk tuck said...

It is very much an option. I shot square with the EPL all afternoon. It's right there on the super menu. There are fewer aspect ratios but there is 3:2, 6:6 (square), 6:9 and 4:3.

kirk tuck said...

John, I pitched that very idea to a publisher half a year ago. They thought the only market for small cameras was for soccer moms....in their defense, the stuff is changing so quickly that any book about small cameras would be obsolete by the time it came out in print. Would anyone like an e-book?

kirk tuck said...

TC, The AF is about the same. As to the top shutter speed, yes.

Raianerastha said...

I find comments about expectations of a camera's appeal interesting. I remember when the OM series first came out. Olympus made a point of saying it was a pro system, but retailers and many pros considered the OM-1 and OM-2 "amatuer" cameras because of their small size and lack of certain pro features such as interchangeable finders, higher top shutter speed etc.

But then pros discovered they were tough little cameras that were a joy to hold and use.

The reality of camera retailing is that the manufacturers try to drive the market demands as much as respond to them. They also know how to cater to gear lust. I know plenty of people who own cameras that have features and performance that far outstrips their genuine skill as photographers. But they are convinced they approach pro level images because they have pro level cameras.

Meanwhile someone with a Holga and unique vision is having a featured exhibit in MOMA...

All depends on what your goal is.

SoftLight Photography said...

Nice review of an interesting camera. For the money I'd rather have this than an LX3 or Canon G series. I have to give Olympus credit, they're making inroads few of us would have thought possible just 24 months ago.

Raj said...

Hi Kirk, do you see yourself using the E-PL1 more than the E-P2? The only reason I wasn't very interested in the E-PL1 was its absence of dials, however this doesn't seem like much of an issue for you; on the contrary you seem to consider it as a benefit. Could you please tell me more about your experience on this? I'd really appreciate it.

Curt Schimmels said...

I own an E-P1, and I played with one the other day at the local photography store (Keeble and Shukat in Palo Alto, CA). I was quite impressed with it, and also impressed by how much the staff there liked the camera. I think it sits across both markets nicely - I could recommend it to my sister-in-law, who doesn't want "too complicated," yet I can also recommend it to my friends who are advanced amateurs. Most importantly, I could easily see myself picking one up!

Anonymous said...

Thanks for your review. I am an amature photographer (30+ years) using my camera mostly for travel, hiking, cycling, skiing and UW photograpy (nikonos II). The walls of our house are covered with all the photos my daughter and I have taken on our various adventures over the years. In good light with some post processing, you would be suprised at how good some of the photos can be from point and shoots (e.g. my daughter's nikon L18). My background is from compact film rangefinders. I never did like SLR format (breifly owned Olympus FLT screw mount and later Pentax ME-got rid of both of them quickly)and did my own darkroom work. Didn't take long to learn that the camera you have with you takes much better pictures than the camera you left at home. Detoured into APS film cameras breifly. Cameras were great compactsbut couldn't develope my own film and cost was high. I am not a gear feind. Waited for my first digital, Nikon 5400 which I loved. Along with 1.5x Teleconverter could shoot just about everything I could with my rangefinders and teleconverters. Took great 8 x 10's, 5Mpix more than enough resolution for film like prints. Now sits at bottom of Carribean sea due to a diving mishap. So bought e-pl1 and a M mount adapter for use with my 40mm f2.0 and 90mm f4.0 lenses to replace it. Sold one M mount body with 50mm Russian lense to fund purchase. Fisrt impressions: At low ASA, set to 5 Mp resolution and Super Fine JPEG compresion picture quality comprable to Nikon 5400 at 5 Mpix RAW. Auto focus OK-even in low light. Just pick part of the sceen with some sharp contours and pre-focus, just like you used to do. Don't know what everyone is complaining about. People complained about auto focus on 5400 and I thought that worked fine too (camera often said it hadn't achieved focus but in fact focus was OK-28 mm lense on small sensor, depth of field was huge anyway). Manual focus on e-pl1 works surprisingly well and I like it. Very quick, similar to using a rangefinder. Magnification assist stops by itself as soon as you release focus ring and goes back to composition view. M mount Rokkor lenses are compact and reasonably fast, but heavy compared to Olympus plastic lenses and not as sharp wide open as I thought they were. Maybe modern lense design really has improved, computers and all. Real advantage is in higher ASA setings of e-pl1. Nikon 5400 was noisy above ASA 200. E-pl1 usable all the way to ASA 1000. This allows ASA to be used as alternate exposure adjustment tool equal to F-stops. Really expands ability to get the shot (telephoto indoors, e.g. jymnasium, low light non-flash photos) and well as creative control. Also, can set Fn button for depth of field preview on auto aperature lenses because no depth of field scale on lense-haven't figured out how use zone focusing with these lenses-probably impossible. I liked fill flash on Nikon 5400. E-pl1 ability to conveniently dial in +/- fill flash in small ev steps is real advantage. Camera is still a little too big for travel with 14-42mm zoom. Nikon 5400 just about perfect in this respect. Naive micro-4/3 mount manual focus, manual aperture control lenses should solve that problem(e.g. Noktor concept). I really don't need auto focus at all excpet for movies. Do miss swivel LCD screen. Camera appears to be a battery hog. Camera/zoom lense combo still to large. Maybe this concept applied to 1/1.7 inch sensor would be ideal? But then M mount lenses would be worthless.

Paco said...

This is my next purchase. Thanks for your personal review. Wish I had this yesterday for the Wrestlemania Event.

Fernando Cundin said...

Mr. Kirk,

We all think that the camera is a fine piece and evident of positive changes in the photo gear offerings from Olympus. The camera should work out OK.

...but what's the story on the watch in the mirror pic? That big honking thing looks like a sextant or a Letherman.

FC

kirk tuck said...

The watch is a left-handed (no kidding) Invicta watch. The winding knob and the timing buttons are on the opposite side from most watches. It's big but it's comfy and accurate. I love big, black watches.

weichi said...

Hi Kirk,

I really enjoy your writing. Thank you! Since I found your blog, I have been coming to visit it few times a week.

I got an e-pl1 about 10 days ago. I really like it. It gives me so much pleasure taking photographs. The gears are no longer a burden. Since I know the camera is with me most of the time, I start paying more attention to what I see.

WC

SoftLight Photography said...

Great thoughts as always. I'm seriously thinking of selling off my Nikon gear and going totally M43 format. Love the E-P1 but would like the E-P2 with the EVF and a GH1 for video/photo work. I just wish they had more low light primes.

Jim said...

Thanks from one more fellow about your revelations on the PEN series. A couple of questions, if you have the time:

Is it a composite lens mount on the camera itself or just on the kit lens, and if the former, using something like the 14-35/2 (or even in my case a 12-60) one would obviously carry the camera by the lens, and really in either case does this in your opinion with heavier glass attached make carrying the whole assembly by the neck strap a bad idea?

Second, and I know that first question was like three or four on its own, did getting the EPL as the back-up body rather than a second EP2 make all the more sense since you already had the EVF from the latter, or does the still-significant savings of getting the EPL + EVF make the most sense as a first purchase at this stage of the game?

I look forward to your reports, especially if you see the difference the new AA filter is supposed to deliver, as well as how you feel about no control wheel a few weeks in. For my part, I`m really on the fence over upgrading to the E-30, waiting patiently for its much-hoped for successor, or jumping on the PEN wagon and keeping my older E-bodies for when I need to look all SLR for a shoot.

Thanks again, Kirk, and all the best.

kirk tuck said...

Hi Jim, Quick answers: the mount on the camera is metal. Still, given the size I wouldn't carry around big, SHG lenses unsupported. But I don't let the 35-100 put all it's weight on the E3 mount either.

I got the EPL both as a back up but also because I was intrigued by the weaker AA filter. I'll do a report on that in a short time. Ultimately whichever camera you get first you'll be most comfortable with the controls. I don't miss the extra control too much but I've stuck the EPL in "Aperture" mode for the most part and use the super panel to make all my quick changes. Works just like an E30 when you use it that way.

I'd bet I could do most of my work with the Pens. The exception would be sports and theatrical photography but when the focus is improved those barriers will fall quickly. When I say barriers I don't mean that the Pens are too slow for every day work, just specialty stuff.

Hope this helps. I have some reports coming up on: using original (film) Pen lenses on the cameras, shooting video with the Pens, and also a high ISO test. Please stay tuned.

SoftLight Photography said...

It must be something with the PEN, but with the E-P1 I almost always shoot in aperture mode and use the super panel as you do. Now I find myself wishing my D90 had the panel. After 8 months the Olympus menus are actually more intuitive to me than all my other digital cameras.

After reading your experience with the EPL1 I'm tempted to wait and see what else Oly has up their sleeves with regard to a higher end m43 camera rather than buying the E-P2.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for all the reviews.

Have you ever found out a way to connect a studio light trigger using a cable to one of the E-Px connectors without removing the EVF ? Maybe Olympus has some way to do it ? Thanks again.

Joe

Kyle @ Photo-Ventura said...

Kirk, love reading your blog, have been a regular RSS subscriber for some time...

After a pre-history in Film photography in my youth, I rediscovered digital photography with an Olympus C760 3.2MP P&S. Yes, people, laugh all you like, but I loved that camera's optics, especially the super-macro function. Slow as a wet week, of course, but I made some beautiful images with that camera and at the time it crammed the most number of cutting edge technologies into the smallest body available... lol, Oh how things change within 10 years!!

More recently I bought a Nikon D300s, with a 50mm 1.4G Nikkor; a 150mm f2.8 Sigma macro and an 18-200mm f3.4-5.6 nikkor walk-around (despite your good Olympus-loving advice, lol) and while I do love the Nikon in the studio and on location shoots where I don't have to move around much, I do find (just like you said!) that I leave it at home when I want to 'wander freely' cos I just don't want to lug all that heavy kit!!

So I've been looking for a better light-weight P&S solution, and it sounds like the PEN might just be it. I have some Olympus lenses with an E510 body: a 12-60 f2.8-4; 50mm f2 Macro; 14-42MM F3.5-5.6; 40-150MM F3.5-5.6; and also an EC1.4 teleconverter.

My question to you (cos despite the gear I play with, I'm still a bit 'slow' in the technical deptartment) is: can I use this collection of lenses with the PEN? or would I need an adaper?

many thanks, Kyle :)

kirk tuck said...

You'll need an adapter. both Olympus and Panasonic make one. They do the same thing. The Panasonic is cheaper. There are 3rd party adapters that are even cheaper. Look for olympus four thirds to micro four thirds adapter. You'll be set. Some of the lenses focus quick. So slow.

Kyle @ Photo-Ventura said...

Another quick question, Kirk, if I use my Olympus 4/3's Zuiko lenses with an adapter on the PEN Micro-4/3's, will I still be able to use their auto-focus functions?

kirk tuck said...

Kyle, The newest lenses with SWD will auto focus pretty quickly. Some of the older lenses don't work as well. An example is the 50 macro. It's a dog to autofocus on an e3, on an EP2 it's like ultra slow motion. But the flip side is that focusing manually, with the automatic magnification, is a breeze and is very accurate.

Anonymous said...

An update of a previous post. I reported that my 40mm f2 Rokkor M mount lense did not seem as sharp on my e-pl1 as I rememberd it on my M mount rangefinder (film). I turned on/off the Image Stabilization, put the camera on a tripod and shot it at f2 and f4. Super sharp. It seems that the IS is conterproductive if the camera is not in fact shaking! So, what I think I was seeing was an image stabilized picture hand held at a low shutter speed which in the film world would have been completely blurred, or at a steady, hand held faster speed in which IS over-compensated. I incorrectly attributed the slight lack of sharpness to the lense. Also have been testing with the 90 mm Mmount Rokkor and am extremely impressed with the results. this truely is the PMDL (Poor Man's Digital Leica). Has anybody tried a Bealuiex (sp?) C mount lense on this camera? Might be the perfect telephoto.

Daryl said...

Thank you for your blog, Kirk.

I'm presently without camera and need to pick one up soon. I hadn't really considered the digital Pens until reading your blog: now my only question is EPL1 or EP2. I probably will go with the EPL1 and EVF, as I like the flash options and the weaker low-pass filter.

One question: did you find the slow maximum aperture at the long end of the zoom range limiting?

kirk tuck said...

Daryl, You are certainly welcome! As to the max aperture, I wish they made a few lenses that we constant 2.8 or even 3.5's. I've been supplementing with the older Pen film lenses and an adapter. Some of them are 1.4, 1.5 or f2. I miss the fast optics.

Daryl said...

I just handled fondled the EPL1 and EP1 at my local Fry's Electronics. Very nice, though they didn't have the EVF mounted. I like the feel better than the EP1. I'll definitely want some faster glass. No used Pen lenses eBay right now, so it may be a search. The 4/3 primes aren't badly priced, though.

Anonymous said...

Further yet update. Worked with the 90mm F4 M mount Rokkor lens this weekend. Late morning weather was heavy clouds leading to rain. Trip to bicycle shop led to photos of bicyle pace lines on lakeside road near shop. Spring colors, blooming cherry trees, green grass, etc. Due to low light shot at ASA 1600 1/500 sec., f8 for enough depth of field to catch 10 person deep pace line. Drove ahead of pace line, parked jeep and set up leaning against tree. No tripod. Used zone focus, aperture preference mode, continuous shooting mode. Worked great. Photos have discernable noise at 100% but are definitely usable. Shooting with legacy rangefinder lenses is a real pleasure and is a strong suit for this camera. Should have tried some panning with IS turned off. Next time.

Anonymous said...

Further update. Shot a track meet with the 90 mm m -mount lens and a mono pod, and a theater event with the 40 mm F-2 rm-mount. Fantastic results. Lack of auto _ focus is a soon issue. Just shoot on A. All your rangefinder skills will return.

Anonymous said...

Interesting devlopment. Was participating in a theater fundraising event. Before getting into the shower, I handed the e-pl1 to my 16 yr. old daughter with my manfroto tripod and told her to go outside and take some pictures. First or second time she used the camera. Got out of the shower, put on my tuxedo and off we went. She took most of the pictures at the event as I was participating, mostly in and on the lobby balcony, a difficult mixed tungsten/sunlight though windows and reflecting off of a gold leaf ceiling. Used the kit 14-42 mm lens and a 40mm F2 m mount legacy lense on an adapter. I showed her how to do manual WB with my hanky and somehow she figured out everything else on the fly from her point and shoot background and one hour with the camera in our yard. This was a very interesting event, with mostly opera solo's an one chours event. She used some of the art filters, soft focus to take pictures of the women in their 16th century gowns, flash and available light as well as grainy film for outdoor pictures on an intricate wrought iron balcony. I did little post processing (cropping mostly) and e-mailed smaller sized versions of the pictures to the participants. Eveyone said they were great. Some asked for full size versions. One of those recipients asked me if they could hire her to shoot their daugher's upcomming wedding! Putting my daughter's natural compositional skills aside (which I think are good) if this isn't a testement as to this system's ability to allow point and shoot amatures to take pro-level photograhps I don't know what is.

Anonymous said...

Last Anonomous comment. Needed to do some repetative portrait work. Got the fl 36R flash and set it up on a cheap reflective/trasmissive umbrella and flash bracket with a reflector disc on the other side to reduce shadows. E-pl1 remotely TTL controls the flash from the camera without calbles. Fantastic results. Like having a studio running on two AA batteries.

kirk tuck said...

That's the cool stuff. Keep it coming.

Anonymous said...

Daughter shot a wedding weekend before last as a favor for the Bride's family using E-pl1, 14mm-42mm kit lens, fl36r falsh and 90mm Rokkor M F 2.0 lens. First wedding she ever did. Dark overcast day in the country. Modern church with clerestory windows, some stained some not, lots of light colored wood on inside. Difficlut lighting to say the least. No flash allowd at wedding ceremony itself so she had to use ISO 1600/3200 frequently. Results were surprisingly good. Rokkor lens produced nice contrasty images. She took about 350 shots and used about 125. She made up album using inexspensive commercial retail self serve printing and binding. Bride's brother also shot wedding with his Nikon FF dSLR. Birde and groom loved the E-pl1 album and asked for reprints for the parents. No one asked for copies of the Nikon FF shots.