7.18.2018

Future Advertising Copywriter/Creative Director Studying old Communication Arts Annuals. Getting great advice from wonderful people in the Austin Ad community.

Ben Tuck. Studying the noble art of advertising.

Many years ago I started out as an advertising copywriter. I would write anything for just about anybody. From public relations stories about model homes for local builders to smart sounding articles about medical or technology "breakthroughs." To be honest I will have to date myself and mention that part of my success was tied to the fact that I started in an age before word processors and my finest skills were being able to type fast, on a typewriter, and with few mistakes. I eventually learned how to massage the content too.

Now, decades later, my kid, Ben, has graduated from college and is seriously considering working in the advertising business as well. His mom (a thirty year veteran of the business as a graphic designer/art director) and I tried to present a truthful picture of the advertising business but he wants to do it anyway....

We've aimed him at accomplished pros in the business and he's been doing investigational interviews with them. Each person has given him a reading list which contains books and publications they think are crucial to the nurturing of a young person's ad career. So far several books are ending up overlapping in the multiple circles of the book recommendation Venn diagram. Regardless of the age of the mentor the one standout book that is a constant recommendation, for understanding both the history and the underlying creative process of advertising, is "Ogilvy on Advertising" by David Ogilvy. It appears to be the timeless bible of the industry.

Advertising is a tough business but not impossible to master. He's a quick study. We'll monitor his progress. 


Photo: Nikon D700. Sigma 50mm f1.4 Art lens. Handheld. ISO 800. 

4 comments:

  1. I remember reading Ogilvy’s book years ago when I was a one-man-band, small-time, one-stop agency, providing concepts, copy-writing, photography, and design for small-time clients. I enjoyed those years a lot, and that book was very helpful.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I can’t imagine why Ben would be drawn to such a career. Must be something in the water.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Who could disagree when it comes to David Ogilvy? On the other hand, when I read the most quoted Ogilvy headline — “At 60 miles an hour the loudest noise in this new Rolls-Royce comes from the electric clock” — my first thought always has been that somebody ought to do something about that damned clock.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Caples books are fantastic. John Fords books. The book 100 Greatest Advertisements. Good career.

    ReplyDelete

Comments. If you disagree do so civilly. Be nice or see your comments fly into the void. Anonymous posters are not given special privileges or dispensation. If technology alone requires you to be anonymous your comments will likely pass through moderation if you "sign" them. A new note: Don't tell me how to write or how to blog!