7.18.2011

Just a few new edits of some ranch photos.


Just trying to do a better job optimizing for the web.

Kirk

7 comments:

Geir said...

And what do you learn? This is something many of us could need some good tips on.

ver1silent said...

For the guitar image, it looks like a levels edit (trading a brighter subject for a little bit more of an out-of-range highlight on the lamp) followed by a saturation change. I suspect that there was a little bit more oomph added to her eyes as compared with the rest of the image.

I like what the levels edit did for her skin tone, but I'm not so sure my taste agrees with where you went with the eyes. They end up going just enough outside the range of natural iris saturation that it doesn't quite feel human anymore.

kirk tuck said...

Levels change and then save for web in CS6 beta. Just kidding, CS5. Most stuff saved out of LIghtroom seems flat to me on the web even though it's profiled with sRGB.

very1silent said...

I just experimented a bit, and it looks like 'save for web and devices' tweaks the saturation slightly. Pre-save, the the histogram looks like the original, but with a series of gaps. Post-save, it has a series of humps and valleys instead of the gaps, just like you get when you increase the saturation.

Maybe that's why you're feeling that the lightroom version looks flat?

MGO said...

Nice job:)

Bold Photography said...

Have you played with DxO optics? They've got film emulators that I tend to really like - and I generally HATE the film emulators out there. You can download and play with it for a month for free....

Craig Yuill said...

Thanks for the reminder to be mindful of the end product. I just posted a photo for the first time in several years. I felt it looked too dark. Adjusting levels a touch made it look a bit lighter and contrastier - more like the original slide, and closer to how I remember the scene. Thanks for the tip.