2.14.2013

The Rokinon 85mm t- 1.5 Cine Lens Photographs chef, David Garrido.


As part of our restaurant project for Garrido's I was asked to make photographs of the chef (and owner), David Garrido. We made images in the kitchen with David surrounded by staff and we made images of David on the patio, but the ones I liked best are the casual ones of David sitting in front of the "tile" wall.

I would love to regale you with stories of how I lit this and I would love to jump into a lively discussion about the virtues of LED versus flash and more. But the reality is that the light coming through a west facing wall of windows in the late winter afternoon was as nice as any lighting I could have designed.

The real story in the image is the lens and camera combo I used. I'd just gotten the Rokinon 85mm 1.5 cine style lens and I was excited about shooting just about anything on which I could train my camera. I put my Sony a99 camera on my wooden, Berlebach tripod, set the exposure to something like 1/30th at f2.8 and blazed away. Jeez.... I didn't even add a reflector for  fill...

Am I happy with my new acquisition? You bet. Best lens purchase ever for $340.

I used the same lens yesterday to do a video interview for Zach Theatre. Well, it was one of the lenses I used. We decided to do a two camera set up in order to have footage to cut away to. I used the 85 R on the a99 as our primary, frontal camera and I used a Tamron 28-75mm 2.8 on an a57 about forty five degrees over to one side as a secondary camera.

I just reviewed the footage from both cameras in Final Cut Pro X and I was delighted all the way around. We have an incredible array of choices at our disposal these days. Next time I'll try the 85mm R on the Sony Nex 7 and see what APS-C's highest quality sensor can do with a speedy lens.

More about the lens: http://visualsciencelab.blogspot.com/2013/02/crazy-photographer-buys-wacky-off-brand.html







15 comments:

Bob Travaglione said...

2 Rokinon 85mm Lenses - Does anyone know what the difference is between these 2 lens, all I can figure is the difference between F1.4 and F1.5 Has anyone read a comparison anywhere?
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00A61RXYE/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_til?tag=thev0c1-20&camp=14573&creative=327641&linkCode=as1&creativeASIN=B00A61RXYE&adid=1HZYSYD8C24KVKX5J9P5&&ref-refURL=http%3A%2F%2Fvisualsciencelab.blogspot.com%2F

http://www.amazon.com/Rokinon-85M-N-Aspherical-Nikon-Black/dp/B0025EX3XK/ref=pd_sim_sbs_p_2

Anonymous said...

That is a wonderfully rendered image from a $340 lens. The soft shadows on his face are just right. The white napkin next to his neck screams to be noticed, though.

Brad Burnham said...

Interesting @anonymous, I didn't even notice that. I saw the lovely light on the face and stayed there for a bit and then noticed the dark, creamy background and went back to the face.

Great image Kirk. I always like light through big windows like that. I'm glad the lens is working out for you.

Brad Burnham said...

I wasn't very clear. The napkin is what I didn't notice.

Anonymous said...

I thought the napkin added some 3d effect, and was done on purpose

chris

Wally said...

Kudos for mentioning the Berlebach wood tripod I have used one for years.

Keith I. said...

There is the f/1.4 and T/1.5. The T/1.5 is the "cinema" model with a stepless aperture ring for smoother adjustment. The T is for actual light transmission as opposed to aperture diameter ration if I remember correctly.

Kirk Tuck said...

The lens focusing ring on the "T" version is equipped with gearing that allows it to work with standard "cine" follow focus rigs. Also the throw on the focusing ring is more linear.

Kirk Tuck said...

Wally, I own two and love them. The feel of the wood on a cold day (or a blazing hot day) is worth the entry price, and they are wonderful tripods.

Clay Olmstead said...

I'm with you. I didn't think about the napkin at first, but I noticed a heightened energy level in the picture. When I cover up the napkin with my finger, my eye settles down and everything is peace and calm.

thequietphotographer said...

Great portrait, as usual. Food for my learning desire. Question, are these tripods heavier compared to conventional ones (similar size/use of course) ? I'm curious, sorry but I'm looking for one to use with my (father's) Rolleiflex.
robert

Kirk Tuck said...

Heavier than fiber carbon but not as heavy (for the same amount of support) as the metal models.

Kirk Tuck said...

Everyone has different tastes. The "nice" thing about digital imaging is that removing the "offending" napkins takes about a minute and not much PhotoShop skill.

Anonymous said...

Damn fine portrait.

Clay Olmstead said...

Exactly. What I was trying to say, and maybe not doing a good job of, is that removing the napkin creates a different feel to the picture that also works, but may not have fit your original intention. Obviously you would have photoshopped out the napkin if it had.