6.06.2013

Hello readers. I hear you loud and clear. You are not interested in hearing about video. We'll try to keep it to a minimum. Really.

 This is NOT a grab frame from a video...




61 comments:

Sayuuk said...

I like to hear about video... =/
It's interesting to read about your change from stills only to moving pictures.
I'm still - hobby-wise - only doing stills, but I'm more and more feeling the urge to try video as well, so reading about your equipment and more "philosophical" views on it and it's differences is great!

Maybe just hide some video posts in here from time to time ;-)

G Gudmundsson said...

ok, I am in a minority of one, read your hybrid article, sent it to a friend...

this is the future... thanks

Anonymous said...

I love reading about your video explorations. It's uncharted ground for me, having shot stills since 1980, but I find I need to come up to speed on it just to remain competitive. More video stuff, please!

Suprada said...

I enjoy reading your video posts as well as your other posts. Your transition from a photographer to a hybrid content maker is extremely interesting and educational. Please don't stop blogging about video.

Richard Leacock said...

Count me in as another of the so-called minority ;-)

But it's a minority that initially appears small but is actually becoming larger and more significant as time quickly progresses. To be able to have stills and/or video to capture or tell a story is becoming more commonplace, part of the imaging culture. Once, having video ability in a slr was an oddity or thought unnecessary. The advent of mirrorless cameras produced some head scratching (what use is this?). But now we have business, amateurs, families etc using this amalgam of technology for their own uses. Marketing in more than traditional formats, home video/stills movie of a family event/journey is out there now. Some won't use it but others are. This is the new standard. A good time to reap the benefits of both : )

Anonymous said...

I enjoy your video articles because i like hearing about how you are constantly learning and adapting, even after so many years in the business. That is inspiring.

Anonymous said...

Interesting. The image that you posted above demonstrates perfectly why stills are more powerful for me. Child with a gesture at a fork in the road - let my imagination fill in the blanks.
Bob
http://deinfaces.com/

Anonymous said...

Wow! I enjoyed the video article. Also liked the marketing message. Pls keep up the great work!

-Neil

Anonymous said...

Also, I really enjoyed the post about your son giving you advice about editing video. I am in the same boat. I feel like I don't have any rhythm when I try to edit video. Again, great post!

-Neil

Kirk Tuck said...

Teaches me to take initial feedback too seriously. thanks for the feedback.

Anonymous said...

Please keep continuing to post about video and photo. You are one of the few who do. More importantly, if that is what you are passionate about writing about, then that's what you should write about :)

Anonymous said...

I agree with the others here, please continue posting about your experiences with video. If for no other reason, this is the reality of your business. At the risk of sounding like an economist, the market is proving that video matters in this context.

Howard said...

Kirk, video is a new and (100%) different topic to your norm; not what most have expected from your blog. That said, you are an articulate, entertaining, and truthful writer who happens to be a very good photographer; and I would opinion a survivor. If video is the evolving future for a professional photographer, why would your readers not want to be kept abreast. Sure, my preference would be stills, however, you write for the interests of all your readers. Those of youth. and just starting, i.e. "Bens" will one day be the Kirks. Let us continue to follow the paths of each, but don't forget your roots.

Michael Matthews said...

Here's hoping my negative comment about your sample video didn't contribute to the conclusion in the headline. Video is an interesting topic.

In fact, the photo-illustrated piece you posted recently about portrait lighting is virtually a storyboard for a video that needs to be made. The script is 90% written. It offers an opportunity to intersperse to-the-camera narrative with voice-over activity, interspersed with stills showing the result of what's being demonstrated.

It can be as simple or as visually complex as time and energy allow. This sort of thing is personal work, basically an opportunity to gain facility in editing, yet of interest to those of your readers who may care only about still photography.

Lacking deadline and cost constraints, videos of this sort also are open ended in running time: you're not trying to jam more than will fit into the 29.5 seconds of a 30-second PSA. The pressure is off.

You might enjoy it.

Carlo Santin said...

Probably not a good idea to base your blog's subject matter on the number of hits you may or may not receive. Nor would I suggest tailoring your blog to the people who respond in this space here. Write what you need to write, say what you need to say, explore your vision. I assume that's why you do this? Do I assume incorrectly? Who cares if your hits drop by 50%? Who cares if they all go away? I like reading about your journey into video, I'm sure many others do as well. If you need the blog hits to feed your ego, or to give you some sense of accomplishment, or if you feel the need to please your readers...well then, good luck to you.

dd-b said...

I'm interested in your business transition, and in lighting. Video is relevant to both, and I'm even playing with some video myself (after almost majoring in film way way back in college).

Not sure if you're responding to actual negative feedback, or just to fewer comments -- but I comment less on video because I don't think I have as much to contribute there.

typingtalker said...

There was a time when (some) photographers didn't want to hear about color. Or digital. Or inkjet. Or zoom lenses.

Keep the video coming.

Neal said...

You should just write about whatever makes you happy.
I'll either stick around or I won't. Even I don't know which yet.

...but for the moment, I'm enjoying your writing.

Robert said...

I'm with Neal, write what you want if I don't want to read it I won't. I thought I was in the minority about not caring about video, I'm surprised but glad that I am not.

Kirk Tuck said...

Nope, I took all your pointers in the most positive way. I incorporated them into my next project.

Kirk Tuck said...

It's not the blog hits it's the off line e-mails. First time I've gotten a rash in response to a subject category..

Kirk Tuck said...

responding to a dozen off-line e-mails suggesting I pull the plug on video. The response here in right on the money. It's what I wanted and expected from my blog friends.

Dr. Nick said...

You should definitely write about what you are interested in. It seems video is becoming very important for the personal photographer. I can't say I am particularly interested in making my own videos. In fact, on news sites, I greatly prefer reading an article rather than watching the same article in the video at the head of the piece.

Dr.Nick said...

Bah. Very important for the professional photographer.

Ed Posthumus said...

Hi Kirk
I would like to improve on what Carlos had to say, but I can't, so i won't try.
Thank You for the information and the insight into all aspects of your work.

Craig Yuill said...

I didn't know we could send off-line e-mails to you. Count me in among those who really like your posts about video. I am one of those who frequently shoots stills and video clips, so blog entries about stills and videos very much interests me. Please ignore the stills purists.

Craig Yuill said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Andrew Wessman said...

That's the internet for you; 10 people complaining are always louder than 100 happy ones.
I'm just a recreational shooter, but to me I take photos and videos both with my A65, because it triggers memories differently later. I appreciate your insights into both, and it's your blog, so I say publish what you want.

David said...

Sounds like its time to change your email address. That might help to cut off the crap.
Keep posting you, thats the only thing I like to read.

Bill Bresler said...

Good point. I'm shooting video for my newspaper's website. Believe me, I've got a lot to learn. I second typingtalker's comment.

KinMun mrbrown Lee said...

Why not? Both are so much a part of a photographer's world now.

Dave Jenkins said...

It's your blog. Write what you want. If a post doesn't happen to interest me, I'll skip it and come back tomorrow.

Dave Jenkins said...

The photo reminds me...Yogi Berra said, "If you come to a fork in the road, take it."

Anonymous said...

The reason I keep coming back here, Kirk, is that you write about your passion. I notice a lot of time it clicks in with Reader interest, but it is not a requirement. I really hope that that remains a quality of this blog. I think it is absolutely essential, with no qualifications or limitations on my part.
-Ernest Zarate

Marino Mannarini said...

Kirk, please do not give up on video blogging. You early posts on the subject is what ringed a bell for me about video. Both as something new to me to try on, and as a new perspective on my professional work. I much appreciate all your writing on any subject, and the reason i do is the passion and honesty i can feel in any of your words. Cheer up and go ahead!

Ash Crill said...

Hi Kirk,

Are you writing posts that appeal to the masses or posts that appeal to yourself?

Video is an interesting subject but it is also a growing niche. Some of us have no experience with video and enjoy your posts on the subject. If you continue writing about video then maybe our number will grow.

-Ash

sid6 said...

Hello!

I've also enjoyed reading your posts. Lots of good thoughts on the evolution of the medium here. I even picked up your book about lighting.

JAR

MartinP said...

Solving imaging problems is always interesting. You write about the 'why' as well as the 'how' and this is interesting to read in any photographic field. A formal balance between stills and motion might need to be made, to reduce your doubts-and-stress stuff, but whether that is based on the proportion within your paid work or on the volume of correspondence is completely up to you - it's your blog :)

Paul said...

Stills or moving images it's all photography if we are to be pedantic. Keep the posts coming I like to see how others are incorporating the shift in their business model. To me photography is primarily a service industry and if you are not providing a service that clients want you are no longer in business.

Anonymous said...

Please keep writing about video. Please keep writing about how your business is developing.

I was asked to shoot video, on a stills shot, for the first time this year. As I was shooting I made several comments about keeping the client happy forgetting, of course, that the audio was being picked up. Luckily, I got away with it and they've re-booked me. All part of the learning curve.

Anonymous said...

I've also grown to like the video-related posts more and more. It's easy to see though why many people would not like those so much. It's all about the comfort zone.. :)

Claire said...

I agree with everybody here, keep on doing it !had no interest in video originally but I admit you're starting to spark my curiosity. The post I liked most was about Ben giving advice, that's precious. Also I'm very interested to see how his career unravels, make sure to keep us posted. Which you will of course, proud dad ;)

Joseph Ferrari said...

Video provides wonderful growth to photographers--its a natural progression.

Please keep them video blogs coming!

Bruce Rubenstein said...

I think the issue is that you have two groups of readers: commercial photographers and lunatic fringe (don't shoot Canon or Nikon) hobbyists. Just on the basis of having made it through the last 20 years as a commercial photographer, you should be required reading for anyone in your business. On the hobbyist side the lighting pieces, let alone the video, is "interesting, but not something I'm going to do", for the most part.

As an aside; in the 90's I somehow found my way onto a forum run by Jack Resznicki and Gary Gladstone. 90% of the threads were about the business end of photography. If you really want to see readership drop off, write long posts about the new accounting software you're using.

Kirk Tuck said...

What is "accounting software"? Is this something I need? :-)

raingeek said...

Hi Kirk,

I don't shoot video myself, yet. However, I am interested in the growth that comes through creative challenges and your writing about it. Please don't stop.

Peter E. said...

Yes for video!

Chris Mielke said...

Kirk,

Weren't you only going to write about what interests you? Well if video does than go for it. Personally I would like a few less articles. I can't keep up.

Chris Mielke said...

Kirk,

Weren't you only going to write about what interests you? Well if video does than go for it. Personally I would like a few less articles. I can't keep up.

Craig Soars said...

I read much more than I comment, but had to chime in support. As far as I can tell, this blog is fed by your experience, insight and learning. Video is an important way for you to grow and develop your livelihood - and you seem to have developed an efficient way by sharing lights and tools to maintain a consistent look.

Now you're getting feedback from your son and your readers by being open (and brave) enough to share clips and solicit advice. For those of us without a reader base to gather feedback from, we can quietly read and learn from your efforts.

And that's part of what makes this site great.

Your offline emails sound like yelp reviews - negative attitudes are disproportionately represented. Hopefully the comments here are convincing you the video content is appreciated more than you think.



Kitchen Riffs said...

Heck, keep posting the video stuff. It's not at all my interest, but it's one of yours, and I enjoy reading about what interests you. Besides, I'm always interested in learning more about how people work, and I found your last post extremely interesting. I think combining still and video photography with one lighting setup is a clever marketing move, and I'll bet you're ahead of the curve on that. Write what you want — I'll still read it — but remember the blog needs to be satisfying to you in order for it to stay interesting. And if something truly isn't interesting to me, what's the big deal about skipping a particular post? You post tons of stuff, so there's always something fun to read when I come here.

Anonymous said...

I have had a large number of small business clients in my general law practice over the years and have a facination with what makes and keeps them successful. The digital revolution has sunk many good professional photographers but you found a way to stay in business and prosper. Video is only a part of your adaptations. I congratulate you and have enjoyed your business stories. You are lucky to earn your living while fueling your passion for the art of photography. Jerry Kircus

PS I signed in as Anonymous because I have no idea what a URL is.

Anonymous said...

I enjoy reading about it.
Thank you.

Bruce Rubenstein said...

Not a clue. I'm a W2 zombie. In the years I make enough shooting over the top birthday parties for 13 year olds, and have to do a Schedule C, I just make things up.

Kirk Tuck said...

Absolutely, Thanks Craig.

Anonymous said...

What kind of &**!>?holes write emails to tell a blogger that they're following they don't like the blog? What is this, the first grade? I'm not interested in the topics discussed in every single blog you (or anyone else on earth) writes but I wouldn't think of emailing and criticizing the author. And, I still read all the blogs very faithfully-maybe I'll learn something new (a concept that can't possibly clutter the minds of the aforementioned emailers). Keep on expressing yourself and your pursuit of art and commerce.

dave said...

Video is hard, for both the viewer and the creator.

For viewers, it might take 1 second to mentally process most photos. Processing a video cannot be done in a second; it requires a significantly greater mental effort.

If you go on a trip you can shoot 500 pictures. When you get back home you can pick out the 25 best, put them on your iPad and you are ready to start showing them. With video, getting something, short enough not to be a burden to watch and interesting enough to be acceptable to show is a lot more work.

I think, largely because of this, a lot more people create photos instead of video.

On the other hand video can capture a lot more meaning than stills. When I look at pictures of myself at 7 or 8 I sometimes think: who the hell is that guy? When my kids look at video of them 10 years ago they never ask that. They laugh and run over to over family members to tell them they have to see a clip. My nephew was bed ridden for many months a few years ago and he spent a lot of the time reliving happier days by playing the hours of video I had shot of him and his cousins. Although I also shot tens of thousands of stills they did not have the same value.

When you are shooting people doing something they care about their personality comes through and it is easy to understand in detail what was going on when the video was shot. When you are shooting stills this only happens sometimes and rarely to the same extent.

I went to Barnes and Nobel this morning and in the magazine section there were 2 video magazines and maybe 20 for photography. On the other hand, almost every website, every television show, and a host of other avenues need high quality video.

If you are focused on hits for your blog, focus on still photography. If you want a career where you can provide value to your customers and not be crowded by everyone with a $3,000 camera do video. The blog is a way to build a community and build your reputation. While you need hits to do this, hits are not the only goal.

As a compromise, talk about both and list the category of each post at the top of the post. Then you can reach the broader community that is more focused on stills and still use the blog to build your video career.

fotographx said...

Video is becoming part of the process of photography. It appears that models are now using video clips in their portfolio. I had a 5Dii for years before I attempted to do a video with it. Now I'm hooked. Actually I took a trip a few years ago and I did what I called 'sound bites' short videos, usually around a minute or so and those little clips are really good memory triggers. I got a sound bit at the Deutsche Museum of one of someone playing one of the museum's pianos. Great impromptu moment. Now my 'sound bites' are an important part of any trip I take. I mean I could have taken a photo of the guy playing the piano but I would have never been able to hear it.
There is a learning curve to video and it would be helpful to hear about what trips your trigger from time to time. I think the idea about blogging is to share both the good and bad so people like me can be better informed.
That was my two cents.

Raianerastha said...

Kirk, keep in mind, there are still people complaining about dslrs and mirrorless cameras even having video capability. Don't let pundits and pedants prevent you from sharing your first-hand experiences and insights in ways that can help others, whether we be pros or simply people who enjoy photography.

I recognize in my own pursuit of photography as a means of income (if not a full time career) that I must be able to provide video capability, notwithstanding that my chosen path is a combination of performance, event and photojournalism/editorial documentation. Gleaning from your knowledge and experience is very helpful, and saves the time and pain of discovering some things the hard way.

Daryl Davis said...

I also am trying to learn my way around video. Keep it coming. Please? Pretty Please??

Clay Olmstead said...

Ahh...this is nice. Rather than learn about the latest trends and tools, I'll just keep my head in this nice, warm sand. That way I can go on believing that I'm right and the world is wrong. Yes. It's nice and dark in here and the sand makes a nice tight fit around my head. Wait a minute - what's that smell? (Sniff, sniff) THIS ISN'T SAND! AHHH!