12.16.2009

Sometimes advertising concepts are unusual.....


Men: An Owner's Manual.


A while ago I was asked to shoot an ad concept for a cooperative ad bound for national newspaper insertion.  The client was Bookstop Bookstores, the first "category killer" giant bookstore chain.  The ad was to promote a book called, "Men, An Owner's Manual".

The agency creative team was fun and cynical and willing to take risks.  Lots of risks.  And so was the client, for that matter.  With tongue firmly planted in cheek the agency comped up a layout that pretty much matches the above photo and flew it past the client's marketing team with zero friction.

We convinced a new hotel in town to "loan" us a room, booked a couple of models and headed over for an afternoon of insouciance.  Mild room service.  No fiscal damage.

This is hardly high art.  Shot with a Leica M4 with an old chrome 35mm Summicron and some 100 iso black and white film.  Hand processed.  Printed on fiber paper.  Old school.  Two old strobes, probably Normans.

Just found in a stack of ad stuff.  It's not in a book.  It's just here.


3 comments:

Bill Beebe said...

I remember the Bookstop here in Orlando (next to Altamonte Mall). I purchased a lot of tech and science fiction books from there. Part of an occasional family Saturday was to drive up there with both our little girls, have lunch at Uno's, then walk into the little chocolate candy shop between Uno's and Bookstop, then go over to Bookstop to browse and perhaps to make a purchase. They were bought out by Barnes and Noble years ago and that little bookstore was closed out. We lost a little something when that happened.

kirk tuck said...

Bill, Bookstop started right here in Austin. I worked as a creative director at an ad agency called Avanti Advertising and Design. We were the agency of record from the early 80's up until they were purchased by B&N in 1987. They were one of the funnest clients you could imagine...

Anonymous said...

This looks great! Your film work is really special, particularly your portraits. They seem to have a timeless warmth to them. I know the market demands the immediacy of digital, but you might want to shoot more film whenever possible.

Cheers