12.12.2015

When photographing seriously, seriously, take off your sunglasses. Especially if you are using an EVF....


If you wear polarized sunglasses you will have difficulties using an EVF. There is a cancellation effect that makes viewing the whole frame well pretty much impossible. And I'll have to say that when you are in a dimly lit convention center, even with an optical viewfinder I think you'll find composing a photograph easier if you are able to get your eye close enough to the finder to see the edges of the frame.

Just a public service, education posting. Sunglasses. Hmmm.

6 comments:

amolitor said...

That dude seems to mainly be serious about his hair. But he is very very serious about that.

Anonymous said...

You will notice this guy doesn't even know how to hold the camera. Cradling and bracing to cut down on vibration makes for better and sharper photographs.
Then again - 'You buy a camera, you are a photographer. You buy a piano, you own a piano."

Anonymous said...

I'm guilty of wearing sunglasses while taking photos, although I'm not one to wear sunglasses inside. On bright sunny days I'm often wearing my polarized sunglasses and have a polarized filter on the front. The 1/2 black frame is a quick reminder...

Huw said...

Kirk,

I've often meant to ask you this: do you wear sunglasses when out photographing in the summer? I find it very difficult to reconcile the polarised/tinted view of the world that sunglasses provide with the reality (often harsher and less pleasing) that the camera captures. I make a choice between sunglasses and camera, as to what I see and therefore photograph.

I've never considered combining both, as this chaps does, so maybe I'm missing a trick! And I evidently ought to spend more time on my hair.

Huw

Michael Meissner said...

Unfortunately, I pretty much need to wear sunglasses all of the time when I'm outdoors, or else I will soon be in a dark room with migraines. I find the E-M5 mark I and Stylus-1's EVF's to be tolerable with polarized sunglasses. There are parts of the EVF scene that are fuzzy, but it is enough for framing the picture. Unfortunately, the E-M1's EVF is pretty bad with polarized glasses (and the VF-2 viewfinder). I assume the E-M5 mark II and E-M10 mark II would have similar EVF's, so I may be stuck at the E-M5 for awhile.

Kirk Tuck said...

Also, I have found that RayBan makes many, many different models of Sunglasses that do not have polarized lenses and which are a much better choice for photographers who must limit UV and IR radiation for their optical comfort. While I prefer polarized lenses for driving I always keep a pair of Raybans handy for working in direct sun. I can see the EVFs. Most times though the sunglasses spend my shooting time on top of my head, coming down only when the finder is removed from my eye.