1.25.2017

A quick question about a book. Video production for still photographers. Is anybody interested?


I'm discussing doing a new book with a publisher. I think there is a real hole in the market for books on video production for photographers; people who want to incorporate video into their practice. Or people who just want to get up to speed with main stream video production.  As you can probably guess, the book market is dicey and while I believe pretty strongly in the need for a well researched, well written, 128 page volume (180-220 photographs illustration concept+25K-30K words) that covers the basics (from "what all the controls mean" to "how do I get good, clean audio") I thought I should do some market research, and what better place to do so than among my VSL reading family?

The question I am interested in getting answers to is this: Once the book is available for pre-sale on Amazon.com do you think that over the course of three to six months that I can get 300 pre-orders for such a book? The selling price would be under $30 (U.S.).

No obligation but would you help me with my market research by letting me know if you would be interested in such a book in the comments section?

Much appreciated. Kirk

86 comments:

milldave said...

Yes please!
Sign me up.
Regards,
David

Mike said...

Holy cow, yes! I had considered posting that suggestion in the comments earlier. I'll be the first to buy, just dumb it down for me, please.

milldave said...

Yes please!
Sign me up.
Regards,
David

Mike said...

Let me add to that, too: if you did a hands-on workshop, I would be all for that, too.

Mike Teegarden said...

I would. Especially if it covered some basic editing suggestions, lighting and sound tools.

Anonymous said...

Hi Kirk,
I'd definitely buy this book, preferrably in an e-book format.
Cheers
Norbert

Wayne Pearson said...

I'm good for one. Great idea. Much prefer a book to the online solutions out there.

Wayne

Anonymous said...

Definitely interested.

Dwight Parker said...

I'll commit to buying one to help you out.

Keith Douglas said...

That would be an interesting book. I'd pre-order.

Anonymous said...

Yes, definitely!

Michael B. said...

Hi Kirk, I am very interested in a video book. We run a small advertising agency and I´m sure, that it would be very helpful for occasional video jobs and my beginner knowledge. I have already three of your still photography books, they are very well made and worth every cent (...I worked in the book publishing business here in Germany for many years, also edited a few photography books).

Blogging Photographer said...

Yes I'd be interested. How about selling a PDF?

Art in LA said...

Yes, I think a book on video for still photographers is a great idea. For me, it's pretty crazy that I have incredible video capabilities on all of my newer cameras that I very rarely use.

I don't do video because I fear the amount of time it takes to edit raw footage into something others might like watching. Maybe discuss shot planning first (creating the "script"/shot list), and then go through all of the technical details (camera and camera settings, lighting, sound, lens selection, editing, etc.).

Will 25-30K words be enough?!

Dr. Singer said...

I think it's a great idea and at least four years due, esp. as every DSLR, mirrorless, smartphone and point and shoot camera comes with some HD or 4K modes, but determining things between like CODEC/sLOG choices, multi-camera editing software, lens choices, and how to achieve clean stabilization (as well as sound), are sections I'd want to see. Of course, if the focus would be on using DSLR budget gear, rather than a $60,000 ARRI RED rig would be of major interest.

Michael Matthews said...

Sure.

Anonymous said...

Good idea! Over the last few months my work has laid off our full time video guy and now I'm being asked to provide video content for advertising on top of my normal duties as the photographer. I'm learning I've been incredibly spoiled by the quality of still files compared to video files. There are two areas that I'm struggling with, telling a story, and audio! Years of photography has honed my aesthetic eye for good light and I've found I can produce good looking video files but my ability to put multiple clips together and create a story SUCKS! And my audio sounds like crap. lol!

Ron said...

if Kirk is writing it I would be quite excited about it.

Fred said...

Of course!!!:-)
My preference would be a physical book so I could underline and write in the margins.

Peter said...

I'm one of your readers who don't do video at all, but I would per-order the book just to get a better understanding of what I'm missing. If it could show me how to get video from the mirrorless cameras I own, that is not totally awful, and without buying a ton of new stuff, and short circuiting the (presumably) steep learning curve, I would be delighted. But make it an actual book please, not an e-book.

Peter Wright

Peter Dove said...

Yes. Been wondering if there was something like that out there. I'd also prefer a dead-tree type of book.

Bill Bresler said...

Heck yes! I'm in. I do a fair number of quick, dirty and short videos for our newspaper's website. I'm doing video now for a few freelance clients and it's nerve-wracking. I'm way undercharging because I can't get used to how much longer it takes to produce video as opposed to stills.
If you ever decided to do a workshop on video I'd be up for that, too.

Bill Stormont said...

I'd also be interested, but not for a "real" book—either (or both) an e-book or PDF, as others have suggested. The physical book would end up on the shelf; the others, on a mobile device, etc. ANY version, written in your style, would be successful…

Mike Rosiak said...

I'm in. Paperback, please. And give sufficient weight to the audio part.

Malcolm said...

Not for me thanks. I am not trying to be negative, I am sure there will be a ready market for a book that allows someone to make the most of the video functions of the camera. But I am not one of them I'm afraid.

Jim Lawrence said...

A lot of the information is scattered throughout your Blog. Getting it in logical sequence would be perfect. Count me in.

Rich Gift Of Lins said...

Yes please - definitely. Count me in! I'm primarily an amateur stills photographer who started making videos a couple of years ago. I'd prefer a real book, but could cope with an electronic version as well. It's a great idea.

Anonymous said...

I have all your other books and would definitely be interested in one that covers the basics and terminology of video.

Remember that you need to get a lot of people "in to" video, so start at the beginning and work up. Probably looking at 2 volumes - basic and advanced.

And I would like a real book with either an included DVD of video clips (after all this is a book on video) or links to related demonstration videos.

Can't wait to read it!

Roland said...

Hi Kirk,

I'm interested as well but I'm based in Germany. So I'm not sure if preordering would be an option for me.

Anonymous said...

I would be very interested - it would be great if you could not only focus on a finished product model but also how to get the best "seat of the pants" results when out shooting and an opportunity comes up.

Don Karner said...

I'm in for a real book. Sounds great.

phil said...

Count me in.

Larry Sumners said...

Been waiting for you to do it. Count me in.

James Pilcher said...

No. I wish you the best of luck on your venture, but I'm just not in your target market, and never will be. I own two cameras that can do decent video. I don't even know how to start a recording since I reassigned the video button. As you have discovered, video is an entirely different discipline than is still photography. It's a discipline I care not to master.

Tom Vadnais said...

Heck, yes!! I'd buy both the paper and Kindle versions. Sure hope you do that.

Peter said...

Yes please. I would be especially interested in info on script and editing, not the mechanics as much as the why and the theory of how to tell a story with images. It would be great to get your view on equipment but I think equipment is a moving target and could be outdated quickly. The book could be a base that could be updated on your blog

George Bishop said...

I'm in, I badly need some guidance having played with video which came out badly planned and with atrocious sound.

enrique said...


I would be very interested in such a book as long as long as it's written for newbies and not experienced video people as yourself.

Thank you in advance.

$ 30.00 is good.


Enrique Martin

Eric Rose said...

I would be interested, but only if I could purchase a media rich ebook. Something with videos embedded. That way when I'm traveling and need to reference something I will have on either my laptop/iPad/smartphone. I'm plowing through a great book on Web Analytics but would have prefered to buy it as an electronic version.

Kenneth Voigt said...

Ditto what Blogger Jim Lawrence said...
"A lot of the information is scattered throughout your Blog. Getting it in logical sequence would be perfect. Count me in."

STEVE WILLARD said...

I'm very interested. Information on how to get started (I have video capable cameras) but have no idea what to do with the files once shot! I would appreciate information about software, and editing more than anything else, though I know you put high priority on script writing. Lately I have seen some wonderful vlogs, and am interested in how that done. I'd love to be able to record personal interviews/portraits.

Michael Matthews said...

Looks like a lot of interest. If it doesn't add up to what Amherst needs to justify the project please consider going ahead with it as an e-book. You have the layout and design capabilty in-house (if you ask nicely) and you can drop the price by 50% and still make more per unit than with a physical book producing royalties. Many of those who say "paper only" may come around when they realize that an e-book viewed on an iPad or other tablet offers as much graphc detail -- even more if you can enlarge photos and illustrations on screen.

True, you lose the advantage of a print publisher's marketing and distribution, but this is the digital age. If you were to move way outside the traditional route and try a Kickstarter project plus selling directly to your blg audience the response might be surprising.

cfw said...

I have no interest in video, only still photography, so I would not order the book. But I cannot speak to those people that want to learn video.

Rusty said...

I'm in

Sherwood McLernon said...

I'd be a good candidate for your book. Just waiting for delivery on a Sony A6500 and would like to dip my toe in the water!

Daniel Walker said...

Please , go for it.

Anonymous said...

Already have your LED lighting book and the novel, and I could be interested in a book that has to do with portraits (not purely a technical book, but more like your blog posts talking generally about shooting portraits), but I'll pass on anything to do with video. Just not my thing. But good luck if you decide to do it.
Ken

Anonymous said...

Absolutely. I am currently overwhelmed with video of which I know absolutely nothing.

grant halverson said...

Yes, please, and thank you!

Craig Yuill said...

I would be interested in getting a good book on video. But my videos tend to be shot in a casual, run-and-gun style. The stories they tell are determined after the fact, during the editing process. That's a little different from your carefully-scripted approach. Is this book going to be aimed at pros or amateurs?

I suppose areas that I would want such a book to cover would include stabilizing handheld cameras, and getting good audio from the camera's position. I doubt you could create such a book without at least mentioning video editing software, and features to consider when purchasing such software.

Craig said...

I'm interested.

I'm also interested in anything you choose to write about your philosophy and techniques for lighting and posing when creating portraits.

amolitor said...

Maybe.

I have no need for it now, but it's possible I'll need some video production info in the next couple years. If that came to pass, and if there was a Kirk Tuck authored book available, that would be my first choice.

Mark Farrelly said...

i would buy that no worries.

Mark Farrelly said...

I would buy that no worries.

Anonymous said...

Yes, thanks,

Dale

Russ Goddard said...

Yes, absolutely! And linking to video clips to illustrate relevant points would be a huge plus.

Paul Mc Cann said...

I'm in. Especially if it includes basics

Scott Kirkpatrick said...

I'm interested. Don't tailor it too tightly to your current choice of gear. There is a lot to sort out with any choice of gear (right now I'm trying to get through the menus on my E-m5.2s and there is stuff you mentioned back in the days when you used them that I still can't find (PP5 profile??). So advice on what to look for and how to find it more generally will be useful. 4K on cameras as they come along will present new difficulties. Then once the camera is not a stumbling block there is a lot to learn, too. So I think it is a good book direction.

Joe Kashi said...

I'd buy one even despite minimal video usage. You never know when that sort of information might be helpful.

MartinP said...

I must admit that I have no interest in producing video myself, though I can admire a well made result quite happily.

Consider, also, the return-per-unit-work for a quickly outdated** video handbook versus something about the further adventures of Henry White. Good luck!


** Of course, you could concentrate on method, planning and structure of a video project instead of "press button B, move slider X" instruction.

Anonymous said...

Ditch your publisher and sell direct as a digital product. This blog is 10X more marketing than your publisher can offer.

Tom Simonsen said...

I am interested. My video needs would be for filming special moments during holidays and travelling. I suspect your book will cater for more professional needs.

Brad Powers said...

I would pre-order. At nearly 80 years old I'm ready for another challenge.

David said...

Sadly, no. Not interested in video.

Brooke Meyer said...

Yes

David Kay said...

Yes! Soon I hope.

Images West said...

You can mark me down as interested in a copy (paper preferred, but pdf would be okay; no interest in a Kindle version) but as I live in Canada I wouldn't be able to re-order unless it was also listed on Amazon.ca.

Will your book divulge the secret hidden folder location where the fiendish Sony engineers decided to hide their camera's video files?

ODL Designs said...

As I am creeping forward with video as a service to clients I am hoovering up a lot of content. So I would almost definitely buy one.

Rick Musacchio said...

I would like to have this book.

Frank Grygier said...

Yes, I would buy it!

Keith Reavis said...

I'm in. My daughter (age 11) likes to help me with stills but prefers video herself. This would help me to help her grow in this area as I know squat about video. Maybe a Craftsy release down the road as a quick overview of the book to get one up and running with the basics.

George Janik said...

Count me in. I prefer a paperback book with DVD or access to videos. As someone stated above--maybe 2 books. One basic for the unenlightened like me and another later or released at the same time--for those who are advanced. This looks like a lot of work, so Good Luck if you go ahead.

Mitch said...

Yep. That is all.

Nigel said...

Sounds like it's a done deal.
:-)

Anonymous said...

Yes! Looking forward to buying a copy.

Rick Popham said...

Yes!

Rick Popham said...

Yes! I've been thinking about messing around with video and it would be great to have a guide.

Re Welch said...

I'd buy it. I have a couple of your other books.

Scott Kirkpatrick said...

As a potential buyer of this book, I'll describe some user needs. I recently failed at my first attempt to get usable video out of two cameras known to be tricky to set up and control during the shoot (Olympus m5.2's) because my target was too big a step up. I had never shot video, had not used those cameras for over a year, and the target was under stage lighting. I grossly overexposed much of it and got poor sound because I only set levels, having no way to monitor with headphones while shooting. I shot one performance in stills only (much better result) because the damn Olympus "clips" feature couldn't be turned off without doing a full reset, and I couldn't figure out how to get down to 25 fps without turning it on again. Two days shooting video under normal light and studying the results would have been a better investment of time than two days reading the manual, which has only 4 pages overall on video.

It's a truism in marketing that getting the new customers over the hump to a satisfying first use pays off. Maybe you can get some help in getting the book off the runway with a manufacturers' recommendation of some sort.

barryreid.net said...

An up to date book in this vein is very much needed. It has been done before however it's 5+ years since the last worthwhile stab at this book and I'm sure things will have moved on a long way since then.

J Davidson said...

Yes, I'm in.

Jerry said...

I'm in, Kirk. One problem I see is the plethora of good photo/video cameras. You're obviously not going to be using all the cameras available, so a guide using a particular brand is not going to carry over too well for another. That is sort of true of microphones, lighting, etc, but the camera seems to be the biggest hurdle. You're using Sony pretty exclusively right now. I'm still using the GH4 and the will likely get a GH5. I will say your camera/s of choice will likely result in some of your readers (me) considering another brand.

Dennis Elam said...

As others have said, the market is not dicey, it is huge.
Yes after comparing the Sony RX 10 II, just for fun I bought the Pany FZ 300 simply because it has friendly features and I doubt I could tell the difference in my shots.
Now what do I do with it? Gordon Houghton has lots of youtube, but I would love to hear from Kirk Tuck.

Anonymous said...

Yes, as long as you can explain the difference between the signal coming out of a DSLR and one of those $50,000 2/3-inch sensor Sony broadcast cameras; and why one is broadcast-worthy and the other isn't.

David Jacobs said...

Sign me up as well. If possible please include at least one chapter on storyboarding/shot planning with an eye to the eventual edit. Come to think of it, please include a chapter on editing too (particularly with FCPX, which I'm frequently frustrated by).

Greg Tallent said...

Really enjoy your blog. I'm in. Thanks for all the useful information.. buying the book would be a small payback. By the way, you're a 'natural born writer'.